Arts, Crafts, Dance And Music Will Highlight Bridgeton Riverfest

Art in High Places, Part One

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The event is also coordinating with New Berns Ghostwalk, which is tonight through Saturday. It is being touted as Come for the Art, Stay for the Ghostwalk. Jim Hirschfield, a professor, artist and chair of the Intellectual Life Committee at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, is this years RiverFest art judge. Dozens of RiverFest artists and exhibitors will feature works ranging from water-ink, ceramics, acrylics, oils, pen-and-ink to clay, along with art jewelers, wood art, metalwork, stitch designs, authors and handcrafted weather vanes and bird houses. RiverFest and the Cogs and Wheels Project have added Jane Horner, Wendy Osserman and Jane Tigar in a production of TIDES, a multi-media, audience-participation event. It is scheduled for 2 p.m.
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1024 RiverFest

Dogaru’s lawyer has in recent months made contradictory statements about the fate of the masterpieces, saying his client could give back five of them, without providing evidence, later alleging that they might be in Moldova. A separate investigation into the possible destruction of the artwork is pending. Dogaru said that after he was detained, his mother gave the paintings “to a Ukrainian man named Vladimir Vladimirenko living in London”. She declined to comment in the court. Dogaru faces a maximum sentence of 20 years in prison.
To get the original version including any images or video, visit http://news.yahoo.com/art-thief-blames-dutch-museum-negligence-133110261.html

Art thief says robbery was too easy, threatens to sue museum

Romanian Radu Dogaru (C), one of six suspects on trial for a heist at the Kunthal museum in Rotterdam, enters a court in Bucharest on October 22, 2013

It measures 25 feet high at its apex and was installed in 1981, according to the Ascension Church website. “Hosford was a commercial artist in Chicago and came originally from central Nebraska where he loved farm life and farm people. That love of strong people is captured in much of his work; including the figures in the Ascension mural…” Hosford’s public mural fits the same category as much of the “public art” found around the world, in the sense that it illustrates a well-known religious story… in this case, a story from Acts, Chapter 1: Now when He had spoken these things, while they watched, He was taken up, and a cloud received Him out of their sight. And while they looked steadfastly toward heaven as He went up, behold, two men stood by them in white apparel, who also said, Men of Galilee, why do you stand gazing up into heaven? This same Jesus, who was taken up from you into heaven, will so come in like manner as you saw Him go into heaven. We might wonder if, indeed, most public art around the world (Definition One: Art that is publicly accessible) is religiously based? Christian, Buddhist, Hindu, other ancient religions?
To get the original version including any images or video, visit http://www.pagosadailypost.com/news/24260/Art_in_High_Places,_Part_One/